Monthly Archives: September 2019

Sep
18
  • Faulkner rushed into Tassie Shield side

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    Allrounder James Faulkner has been released from Test duties and been rushed into Tasmania’s side to play South Australia in a Sheffield Shield match starting Friday.

    南宁桑拿

    Faulkner was named Australia’s 12th man for the first Test against England at the Gabba, but national selectors released him to the Tigers in a bid to retain form.

    The left-armer will bolster a Tasmanian bowling attack under pressure to perform against the Redbacks in the Adelaide Oval encounter.

    Tigers coach Dan Marsh has put heat on his bowlers following last week’s loss to Victoria.

    “We simply didn’t take enough wickets against Victoria,” Marsh said.

    “With the return of some very good bowlers though, I’m confident we can take the 20 wickets we need against the Redbacks.”

    The Tigers’ batting stocks have also been strengthened by the return of in-form Ed Cowan, who made 51 and 42 for a Cricket Australia Invitational XI against England last week.

    SA’s batting line-up also is stronger for the return of Callum Ferguson, who also featured in the Invitational XI last week.

    Fast bowler Kane Richardson has been named for his first Shield game of the summer after overcoming injury troubles.

    “There will be two players who will be very unlucky to miss out tomorrow and, as a coach, that is what you want – tough decisions on selection,” SA coach Darren Berry said.

    SA: Johan Botha (capt), Tom Cooper, Callum Ferguson, Travis Head, Phil Hughes, Michael Klinger, Trent Lawford, Tim Ludeman, Joe Mennie, Kane Richardson, Chadd Sayers, Kelvin Smith, Adam Zampa (12th man to be named, one to be omitted)

    Tasmania: Tim Paine (capt), Xavier Doherty, Luke Butterworth, Mark Cosgrove, Ed Cowan, Alex Doolan, Ben Dunk, James Faulkner, Andrew Fekete, Ben Hilfenhaus, Sam Rainbird, Clive Rose, Jordan Silk (12th man to be named, one to be omitted)

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Sep
18
  • Concerns over NT alcohol control plans

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    (Transcript from World News Australia Radio)

    To many observers, it’s the Northern Territory’s biggest social and health problem: excessive alcohol consumption.

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    The most recent measure proposed by the N-T government to tackle it is Alcohol Protection Orders, designed to block supplies to problem drinkers.

    But critics say it’s misguided, and they’re calling for postponement of the legislation to introduce the orders.

    Andrea Nierfoff has the details.

    (Click on audio tab above to hear full item)

    Attempts by successive Northern Territory governments to tackle alcohol abuse have included a Banned Drinkers Register, limiting sales of alcohol to one unit per person and the introduction of I-D cards.

    Now, it’s proposing introduction of Alcohol Protection Orders.

    Under these orders, particular people could be banned from possessing or consuming alcohol, and could notenter places licensed to sell it.

    Police would be allowed to stop and search someone they think may possibly be subject to an Alcohol Protection Order, as well as seize any containers they believe likely to contain alcohol.

    Dr Jonathon Hunyor, from the Aboriginal Peak Organisations group, says these new police powers would be excessive.

    “The powers that are given to police are really broad and are not adequately defined. Police are given the power under this law to criminalise someone’s alcoholism. Police can put someone on an APO if they’re charged with pretty much any type of offending, including something as simple as loitering. Police can also search people without a warrant. We don’t give police that power to deal with people who are accused of drug trafficking for example, so why should we give it to the police to deal with a problem like drinking in the Territory?”

    The Melbourne-based Human Rights Law Centre is also critical of the proposals.

    Spokesman Ben Schokman says the new scheme is unlikely to succeed.

    And he worries it will lead to further discrimination against the Territory’s large Indigenous population.

    “One of the concerns that always emerges from powers that are quite broadly drafted and where there is large discretion that is given to police to enforce them is that it ends up being particular communities that are disproportionately affected. We know from a range of evidence that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are overly targeted by police. We know that the tough law and order policies are measures that have been tried to be introduced previously, they haven’t worked so we’re repeating mistakes that have been made previously. At the end of the day they’re measures that are being introduced that simply aren’t going to be effective.”

    But not everyone believes the new orders are too harsh.

    Vice President of the Northern Territory branch of the Australian Medical Association, Dr Robert Parker, says the legislation may be necessary to deal with an entrenched cycle of alcohol abuse.

    “The police have most of the contact with problem drinkers. It’s easy to criticise. It’s a very difficult job for them. I’m not opposed to them having reasonably wide powers to deal with the situation. The current legislation does, to a degree, deal with significant problem drinkers. Locking people up for a period may seem a bit draconian but for people who are physically and mentally addicted to alcohol, it gives them actually a period where they are forced to get off the substance. Although obviously there are concerns about the legal and ethical implications about locking people up for a substance abuse issue.”

    However, Jonathon Hunyor from Aboriginal Peak Organisations says trying to impose laws onto a health problem is doomed to fail.

    He says the Territory government ignored the advice of health experts in developing these laws.

    Dr Hunyor says Indigenous people acknowledge that excessive alcohol consumption is a big problem in their community.

    But he says the proposed legislation should be postponed, while the Territory government consults more with Indigenous people on the best way to tackle the issue.

    “The experts are saying that it’s supply reduction that’s a big problem…but that’s not what the government’s chosen to do, they aren’t engaging with the rivers of grog that pour into our community everyday. There’s no evidence that this tough-sounding policy is actually going to work. It’s a very heavy-handed way of dealing with a difficult social problem. We want the government to start working with Aboriginal people to come up with real solutions to these problems, we want them to base their approaches on what the evidence shows and what the experts tell us.”

     

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Sep
18
  • Indon president’s letter received: Abbott

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    Prime Minister Tony Abbott has received a letter from President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono seeking an explanation about Australia’s phone tapping activity in 2009.

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    Mr Abbott has made a statement to parliament about the correspondence which follows claims Australian spies targeted Mr Yudhoyono mobile phone and those of his wife and some of his closest confidants.

    “This morning I received the letter,” he said.

    “I want to assure the house that the government will respond swiftly, fully and courteously to the president’s letter.

    “As always, my intention is to do everything I reasonably can to strengthen the relationship which is so important to both our countries.”

    Mr Abbott said he wanted Australia to remain Indonesia’s trusted partner.

    Mr Yudhoyono had told Australia late on Wednesday that the letter would be forthcoming.

    Opposition Leader Bill Shorten said Labor continued to support the government in its efforts to improve relations with Indonesia in a timely way.

    “The seriousness of this matter, or the sense of offence that our Indonesian friends are feeling, means that we must redouble our efforts to return to positive and constructive dialogue between our governments,” Mr Shorten told parliament.

    “We know that our relationship can recover, it can thrive, it can prosper, it must.

    “Now is the time for temperate language and carefully calibrated discussions with our Indonesian colleagues.”

    Hundreds of riot police are on standby near the Australian embassy in Jakarta in preparation for protests over the phone-tapping claims.

    Demonstrators in the Indonesian city of Yogyakarta have already burnt an Australian flag in protest over the alleged tapping as anti-Australian sentiment continues to escalate.

    The warning came in the wake of Indonesia on Wednesday cutting defence ties and co-operation on efforts aimed at combating people smuggling.

    Opposition Leader Bill Shorten said Labor continued to support the government in its efforts to improve relations with Indonesia in a timely way.

    “The seriousness of this matter, or the sense of offence that our Indonesian friends are feeling, means that we must redouble our efforts to return to positive and construction dialogue between our governments,” Mr Shorten told parliament.

    “We know that our relationship can recover, it can thrive, it can prosper, it must.

    “Now is the time for temperate language and carefully calibrated discussions with our Indonesian colleagues.”

    Hundreds of riot police are on standby near the Australian embassy in Jakarta in preparation for protests over the phone tapping claims.

    Demonstrators in the Indonesian city of Yogyakarta have already burnt an Australian flag in protest over the alleged tapping as anti-Australian sentiment continues to escalate.

    Indonesia on Wednesday cut defence ties and co-operation on efforts aimed at combating people smuggling.

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Sep
18
  • Fifita reunited with family at RLWC

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    Rising Kangaroos prop Andrew Fifita will run out at Wembley Stadium on Saturday feeling a weight has been lifted off his back after reuniting with his young family at the World Cup.

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    Fifita admitted to struggling badly with homesickness throughout the tournament but he felt instant relief when his newly-wed wife Nikkita and infant son Latu Jay arrived in London this week.

    The 24-year-old Cronulla forward celebrated his son’s first birthday on Wednesday, with his family to watch on from the stands in Saturday’s semi-final against Fiji.

    “It’s like a big weight off my back. It was the best thing ever to see my family,” Fifita told AAP.

    “My wife and I were only husband and wife for a day before I came over here and them coming here has been the best thing for me mentally.

    “It was killing me mentally that I didn’t have any family here, just my brothers in the team.”

    Fifita kept in regular contact with his family over the internet but he felt like he was making up for lost time when he could hold his son in his arms again.

    “The baby’s grown up so much since I left him at home, even in four or five weeks,” Fifita said.

    “He’s walking now and he’s so big … it feels like I’ve missed out on so much.

    “But now being able to go back to see them in the apartment every day, it feels like I’m at home.”

    Fifita says his stable home life and becoming a father are behind his incredible achievements with club, state and country in 2013.

    The NSW forward has played in all of Australia’s four matches at the World Cup and his impact off the bench continues to be crucial in the Kangaroos’ bid for glory.

    Fifita expects the lift gained from his family’s arrival will help him make an even greater mark on the field against Fiji.

    “I play a lot better when I’m happier so, hopefully, I can go out there and do my job knowing that my family are there,” he said.

    “It’s a privilege every single time I run out on the field and play in front of them because they know they are the only thing I play for.

    “Without them, I don’t think I would have got this far ever.”

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Sep
18
  • Scott’s World Cup hopes crash with quintuple-bogey

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    In red-hot form and coming into the revamped tournament on the back of two wins in the last two weeks, Scott had been heavily backed to take individual honours and guide Australia to victory in the team component.

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    The U.S. Masters champion started steadily enough, grafting through breezy conditions to be one-under at the turn.

    Things came dramatically unstuck for the U.S. Masters champion at 12, however, when he sprayed two tee-shots into a tangle of bushes on the right of the fairway.

    Unable to find his first ball, Scott returned to the tee and put his third drive into light rough before over-cooking his approach and seeing his shot roll over the green.

    Needing to get up-and-down for eight, Scott missed his putt from about 12 feet to post his worst single-hole score in a U.S. PGA Tour-sanctioned event since his 10 at the WGC tournament at Doral Golf Resort in 2007.

    “Just a couple of lazy swings today on… 12, and, you know, paid the price,” Scott said greenside. “Just away with the fairies on that hole.”

    WHIRLWIND TOUR

    Scott hit back with a birdie on the next hole, but fell away again with a bogey on the par-five 15th and finished with a four-over 75 to be joint 46th in the field of 60, nine strokes behind joint leaders Kevin Streelman of the United States and Denmark’s Thomas Bjorn.

    Playing his third tournament in three weeks following wins at the Australian PGA Championship in the Gold Coast and the Australian Masters at Royal Melbourne on Sunday, Scott has also had a whirlwind of media appearances and sponsor events in his first trip Down Under since his Augusta triumph.

    “Could be (fatigue), but, you know, it was a little disappointing to do that but stuff can happen and that’s why when you play good tracks like this you need to be switched on at all times and I paid the price today… Other than that is was fairly solid,” he added.

    There was some cheer for local fans as a grieving Jason Day battled to a three-under 68 to sit two shots behind Bjorn and Streelman.

    The world number 18 is mourning the loss of eight relatives who were killed when Typhoon Haiyan pounded the Philippines earlier this month, and his five-birdie round left Australia six strokes behind the leading United States and Denmark in the team component of the tournament.

    Sixty players are competing for individual honours while 26 two-player teams are going for the team prize according to their aggregate scores.

    (Editing by John O’Brien)

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